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Lake Champlain, Lake George, and Richelieu River
HISTORY TIMELINE
By James P. Millard

Part IV (a)- war in the northern department
Invasion from the north- Carleton's Campaign 
september 1776- december 1776 

Events at Ticonderoga and Mt. Independence
the journals of col. jeduthan baldwin, Lieut. James Hadden, and Lieut. William digby

Spelling and punctuation in quotes are as found in the original. Black text with underlines indicates a hyperlink.

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September 1, 1776
"went out early in the morning with Genl. Bricket to lay out som works, but it raind & prevented it. I made up a pay roll for 3 companies of Artifficers. Col. Waile, Majr. Schult & Capt. Crague dind with me & in the afternoon I went to Mr. Hitchcocks Meeting. went over the water to the point & then to the Mills to lay out Col. Brewers Encampment. Col. Brewer & Docr. Honeywood dind with me." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
3
"Arnold reached Windmill Point, eight miles below Isle la Motte and anchored there, 'in a line from shore to shore,' sending his look-out boats a mile below with orders to watch the movements of the enemy at Isle Aux Tętes."**

"About 10 o'clock at night an alarm was given by a cannoe  full of Indians, that the enemy were bearing down upon the island (the wind being fair for them) with 6 or 7 schooners & sloops, and many battows  full of men, on which General Frazier desired we might stand to our arms without the least noise or beating of drums & there wait their arrival. Our works were not near finished, but what cannon we had were immediately drawn up to the embrasures to play on them when landing."--Lt. William Digby ¨

"Gen. St. Clear, Col. D Haws, Col. Lewis dind with me. I supt with Genl. Gates" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 5
"went round the works & over to the point & in the afternoon to the Mills to order the Encampment of Col. Willards Rigiment. this Day Recd a letter from Genl. Schuyler, wrote at albana informing of a Battle at New York, that the enemy had lost 6 thousand, & that we had lost 3 thousand, that Genl. Sullivan & Genl. Sterling were missing, but nothing to be depended upon, as the report was Verbal to Albana."
 -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 6
"Lieutenant Scott went up towards the enemy who were still cruising off the island Amott, [Isle la Motte] about 30  miles from us. He had a cannoe  full of Indians, and was if possible not to return without a prisoner. When night came on, he paddled his birch cannoe  through their fleet."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"this day I dind with Majr. Sherburn at Independant point. we again hear that 1200 Regulars & 600 provencials were killd. in the battle on Long Island & by a letter from Col. Hartly at Crown point we are informd that a Very heavey Cannonade was heard down the Lake for about 3 Hours, which I suppose there must be an Engagement between our fleet & the Enemy."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 7
"Arnold's fleet was anchored off Isle La Motte from this date to the 17th"**

"all hands at work at Daylight prepairing our batteries against the worst."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 8
"I was Very poorly this Morning as I had been yesterday & last Night I Took Camphire that made me Swet all night, this morning took a portion Rubarb that workt very kindly. in the afternoon I went out to Col. Brewers & Willards Encampments & laid out a fort on the Top of the Mount, North of the Mills. no news from our fleet. this Day a party of Canadians & Indians were discoverd between this & crown Point."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


September 9

"I was Very porly with Hard pain in my head & Eyes. at Evning took a Vomit that workt well but kept me up part of the night. heard that the Regulars lost 1461 Men killd. at the Several battles & left on the field besides what were caried off, our Losses said to be between 700 & 1000 killd. & Missing but that several parties have com in Since. no News from our fleet yet."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
10

"was so Sick that I did not go abroad, pain in my head across my Eyes & in my Stomach & Sick at the Stomach but could get nothing to take & so woried the Day thro. about Sun Set our boat Returnd. that had been down the lake to the fleet who informs that the fleet ley at Windmill point, they Sent 18 men on Shoer to make fasheens, a small party Soon discoverd an enemy, about 40 Regulars, Canadians & Indians, who haild them & offerd Quarters which was refused, & they, our people, all got Safe into the boat, but they soon had 2 Men Killd. & 7 wounded which were Brought to the fleet, this brought on the heavey fire from the fleet that was heard & they are yet safe. Recd. 3262 Dollars to pay of My artifficers. a Row galley came Down"-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 11
"paying of my workmen & about 3 o'clock another Row galley came Down. I had a Severe fit of Ague & fever that lasted 9 hours. about Sunset I took a Vomit that workt well & gave Some Relief, but very faint & weak."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
12

"Kept house had a nother hard turn of the fever & ague. Majr. Hay went down the Lake, to purchase Sauce. one Row galley is Called the Congress, the 2d Row Galley is Calld. the Trumball"-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
15

"this Day I misst. having the ague, but was so faint that I can hardly walk, my stomack loathing all kinds of food, a little wine & water or Wine Whey being the chief of what I have taken Since Last Sabath Day. I am much better this evning but far from being well."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
16

"was somthing better and it is of the Lords mercy that I am alive after Such a hard & constant fatigue being out Early & late Crossing the water in the thick Fogs, that are peculiar at this place."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
17

"Wrote to Mr. Forbes. I was better but no relish for food. began to repair my Redoubt."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
18

"was better, dind at Genl. Gateses with Mrs. Hay, Col. D. Haws, Lt. Col. Pallacer and others Col. Pallicer is a Lt. Col, a Frenchman. Lt. Col. Palliceur is com up as an Assistant Engineer. we heard from the fleet that they were all safe, a desarter came in & reports that there is about 7000 Regular and other troops in Canada, they are Very Sickly espetially the forreigners, that the Inhabitants are much oppressed by them & often wish to have the Bostoniens com back again, 2 others that came of with him parted from him & are Missing."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
19
"Arnold removed his fleet from Isle La Motte to Bay St. Amand. While on the way, the schooner Liberty was hailed by a Canadian on the shore who asked to be taken aboard. Capt. Premier, fearing all was not right, ordered his men to go with a boat but to keep her swivels pointed and matches ready to fire if necessary. The man failing to decoy the boat's crew, made a signal which brought from concealment some 300 Canadians and Indians, who fired upon the crew and wounded three. The fire was returned from boat and schooner, apparently with effect as the party retreated."**

"Took physick, I broak out all over Very full which burnt & is Very tedious to bair, but it is probible this may be of great Service for I have been better 4 Days from the time I broak out with this Rash." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 21

"was poorly, went a broad but little. Majr. Hay Came home, has been down the Lake 45 Miles, brought up a plenty of Sauce for our Mess. he Says that 3/4 of all the Inhabitants in this country are Sick, such a time has not been known before." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
22

"I took physic, was better a good deal, feel well to what I have been. Lt. Whitcom & 2 others brot in 2 prisoners, one Ensign Sanders of ye 29th Regt. & a Corporal, which they took a little way from St. John towards longgale, they inform that the Regular army is Collected chiefly at the Oil Oix Noix & St. John."  -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 23
"Arnold, having found the anchorage of the channel between Valcour Island and the main land 'exceedingly  fine and secure,' moved his fleet there and was, in a few days, joined by Capt. Warner of the galley Trumbull."**

September
25

"The Small Schooner Came up from the fleet to be refitted, She brought up 3 men that were wounded at Shanty Point by a party of Regulars that decoyd. a boat on Shore by Sending one man with his pack into the water & hailing for a boat to come & take him in, he Said he had desarted & wanted to get on bord the fleet, but the boat well mand & armd went towards the Shore with Caution, Starn foremost. the ambush was discoverd before the boat reachd. the Shoer & they soon put off & fired there Swivel & Small arms from the boat & the Schooner also fired her guns, when Several of the Enemy was seen to fall. there was a Genl. fire from the Enemy & one of our men was killed & 8 wounded. it is Said there was 3 or 400 of the Enemy in this party." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September 26
[At Isle aux Noix] "We had a violent storm of rain, wind, thunder and great flashes of lightening  during the night. I often thought the tent would take fire. Next morning I mounted advance guard four miles above the island, the storm still continueing,  and passed a most disagreeable day and night with scarce any shelter from the constant heavy rain. We could there hear their evening gun very plain, and it was proposed in a few days to move up to Riviere-la-Cole, seven miles nearer them."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"I went a Crosst. Independant Point to McDaniels to See the Store & Wharf & other works going on there. heard of the Battle at N. York, but the perticulars not Sertain. Majr. Pierce Returnd. Last Evng. Mr. Lucas Returnd. from Philedelphia he was at New York at the time of the Action at Long Island, & New York & brings the perticulars of the battles there. The Congress Row galley of 10 guns, besides Swivels &c Saild. down the Lake." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
September
27
" Had the pleasure of seeing two of our schooners, the
Maria & Carlton, come up to us from St. Johns. Captain Pringle was appointed Commodore of the Lake Champlain and to command on board the Maria, so called after lady Maria Carlton."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"went over to Independant Point with Gen. Gates, Genl. St. Clair & Col. Trumball to view the ground for a fort to be built. afternoon wen to the Mills with Majr. Hay Supt. with Genl. Gates & St. Clair, Col. Waine, Trumball &c all in Very good Humour." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
September
29

"I was round upon the works. Genl. Gates Genl. St. Clear & there families dind with me" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

September
30
"Lieut. Digby, who had been ill and delirious since the evening of the 27th, recovered his senses, but had to be left on the island (Isle aux Noix), while his corps moved up "Riviere-la- Cole."**

"went over to Independant Point. we heard that 3 persons was taken by the Savages from Onion River [now known as the Winooski River] & that our people was com off & left the place. the Soldiers Confined the officers & Brought them off to Otter Creek. I was drawing plans." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 1, 1776
" 'Carleton was prepared to appear upon the lake with a formidable fleet of thirty-one vessels, ranging in their armament from one to eighteen guns, navigated by 700 veteran seaman, and armed in addition by an efficient corps of artillery.'--Watson"**

"went over to the point with Col. Pallaceer to Lay out the fort. we Run Round the work but did not finish. Esqr. Gilliland came up. went with Col. Pallaseer, Capt. Newland & Lt. Dallace over to Independant Hill leying out the Fort agreable to a New Plan I had drawn, the Several Assistant Engineers Dind with me. I Supt. with G. Gates. " -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 3
"Genl. Gates, Revd. Dr. Gordon of Roxbury, Esqr. Gilliland & Mr. McCalley Breakfasted with me. it raind all Day. I had my Accts Settled, Recd. 518. 1/3 Dollars on a Ballance of Acct. & for Service to the 30th. of Septr. Took Physick as I went to bed." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

The British Campaign of 1776 (Carleton)

October 4
The British fleet sails from St. John's. Stopping first at Île-aux-Noix, then at Point au Fer, where they erect a blockhouse and leave a garrison, the mighty fleet of twenty-nine vessels makes its way up the lake in search of the rebel navy.

"Laid out Som works on Independant Hill" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 5
"... About the 5th of October everything being ready, a Fleet consisting of One Ship, Two Schooners, One Radeau, One Gondolas, and 22 Gun Boats, proceeded from St. Johns, up the Sorel River, to the entrance of Lake Champlain, at the Isle Aux Noix 15 Miles from St. Johns. They took in their Guns there being in many places only 8 or 9 Feet water between those places..."-- Lt. James Hadden ‡

"I sailed up in a raddoux [radeau] vessel carrying six 9 pounders commanded by captain Longcroft... The floating battery, Maria and Carlton, sailed with us, and our little voyage was pleasant, the day being fine and the lake now running very broad. General Burgoyne was on board the Maria, who ran aground on a bank, but was towed off without any damage. The vessels were all cleared and ready for action, waiting only for the Inflexible, our largest vessel, which was shortly expected up."--Lt. William Digby ¨

"Majr. Butler brought in Capt. Fassit & his Company Prisoners for desarting there post at Onion River about 80 of them were confind in the fort for trial Joseph Wheeler Esqr Came to Lodg with me. Esqr Gilliland & Esqr McCaley keep with me." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 6
"On the arrival of Brig. Gen. Waterbury with the galleys Washington, Capt. Thacher, and Congress, Capt. Arnold, the entire naval force of the Americans, save an eight-gun galley then receiving her armament at Ticonderoga and the schooner Liberty, which had been sent to Crown Point for supplies, was now at Valcour Island."**

October 7
"The First Brigade moved up to our post at Riviere-la-Cole, and ours went up to point-au-Faire, [Point au Fer] seven miles higher. The order for our proceeding on the Lake was as follows. Three small boats in front of all as a party of observation, our schooners and armed vessels in line of battle following: Gun boats carrying 24 or 12 pounders in their bow and maned  by the Artillery. The battallion  of Grenadiers in flat bottomed boats, and in their rear, the remainder of the army in battows... At Point-au Faire [Point au Fer], the lake turns quite a sea, forming a most beautiful prospect, being intersperced  with numerous islands, mostly thick with trees which at that time of year (the trees changing their colour) added still to the scene. This place is thickly covered with wood, under which we pitched our tents, waiting for the Inflexible; she being obliged from want of water to have her guns brought up in boats, after which a ship of the line would have water sufficient; and it certainly was a noble sight to see such a vessel on a fresh water lake in the very heart of the Continent of America & so great a distance from the sea"--Lt. William Digby
¨

"Genls Gates & St Clear Col. Trumball & Lewis dind with us. we Recd the acct of about 1/4 of New Yorks being burnt. I bought 34 Gallons of Starling mediry wine brought from Albany for me at Dollars pr Gallon is of which we partook an agreeable Glass & then we had a Sociable dish of Tea which Closed the afternoon." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 8
"It blew fresh and a good deal damaged our battows  by strikeing  against each other, on which we anchored our flat bottom boats off the shore, and brought the battows  round a point to a small creek under some shelter from the land. There were many deer in the woods about, some of which we shot, also great flocks of wild pidgeons, which, as our fresh provisions (sheep &c we brought from St John's and Isle-aux-Noix) were almost finished, helped out his majesties allowance of beef and pork very well. The wood was so thick round us, that some of our men were near losing themselves on straggling a small distance from camp, against which there were particular orders. It is surprising, with what a degree of certainty an Indian will make his way from one country to another through the thickest woods, allowing the sun to be constantly hid from his sight by clouds, where a person, not used to such a country, would soon be lost, and the more attempts made to extricate himself, perhaps, would only serve to entangle him deeper."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"made up an Abstract for the payment of the Artifficers & Recd pounds 1372 New York Currency Equal to 3431 1/8 Dollars, Esqr Gilliland, McCalley & Watsons Dind with me. it raind & was Sloppy." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 9
"... The Fleet proceeded to Point Au Fer 18 Miles, leaving the Army encamped at River La Cole 9 Miles short of it on the Eastern [Western-jpm] shore of the Lake. There was also a post taken at point Au Fer, a Block House errected  and four Companies left to defend it..."--Lt. James Hadden ‡

"About 12 o'clock we heard the enemy very distinctly scaleing  the guns on board their fleet, and soon hoped to make [them] exercise them in a different manner."-- Lt. William Digby
¨

"Paying off the workmen. a Court martial Sot for the trial of the Onion River Prisoners Genl St Clear Genl Bricket & the Pay Master Genl. dind with me. after dinner we went over to the landing to Mr. Adams, drank Tea." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 10
"While Arnold was writing a despatch  asking for a supply of shoes, watchcoats, blankets, hats or caps for his men and saying, 'We cannot, at present, determine how long it will be requisite to remain here. It may depend on the intelligence we receive. ***** I have received no late news from the northward. The loss of two small canoes (all we had) has prevented my sending out small parties,' the British fleet, having passed out of the Richelieu, was sailing up the lake and anchored that night between Grand Isle and North Hero."**

"About 12 o'clock our small fleet sailed up with a fair wind, which was a most pleasing sight to the army. Their decks were all cleared & ready for immediate action. Genl Carlton went in person (tho. many blamed his hazarding himself on an element so much out of his line), on board the Maria, and gave command of the fleet to Pringle as commodore, by which he was of little service on board,... The wind blowing fresh, we expected shortly to hear of their engageing,  on which our fate in a great measure depended."--Lt. William Digby ¨

"went to the Mills & Col. Brewers Encampment bought a 34 Gallons of wine paid for it 106 1/4 Dollars, forty two pounds ten Shillings N. York money bought a Cheeney bowl for 3 Dollars of Esqr. Gilliland."  -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
October
11
The Battle of Lake Champlain takes place at Valcour Island. In a desperate struggle the rebel navy takes a horrific beating from the far superior British fleet. Somehow, Arnold manages to escape in the darkness  with the battered remnants of his fleet south to Schuyler's Island.  Here he stops to take stock and determine a strategy for saving the rest of his navy from the pursuing enemy. Leaving behind two gunboats too damaged to continue, he continues to flee south to relative safety at Ticonderoga. (Lieut. Hadden was present at the Battle of Lake Champlain. He chronicled the battle in his Journal, click here to read the full account.)

" We were in hourly expectation of intelligence. Our Indians were on the banks of the lake, who, we eagerly hoped, would come down to inform us of anything particular, and that day passed over in the greatest state of uncertainty."-- Lt. William Digby ¨

"went over to independant point, began to Set up the pickets all was well & without fear." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†



October 12-13

" Was awoke very early in the morning by a confused noise about my tent, and on hearing the word Carlton named, imagined something had happened, so arose and made the greatest haste to the shore side, where a boat had just arrived with our wounded men from the fleet. The accounts were, that our fleet came pretty near them, when the wind shifted a little about, when none of our vessels could haul so much to the windward as the Carlton, who made all the sail possible for them and stood most of their fire for a long time, assisted by a few gun boats; that the Royal Savage engaged her, and at last was obliged to strike to the Carlton, but, against all the rules of war, after strikeing,  they ran her on shore, blew her up, and escaped to the wood. The greatest praise was given to lieut Decars [James Dacres] for his spirited behaviour, as he did not retire till so much shattered in masts & rigging, as made it necessary to tow the vessel off by boats. Our gun boats also did great execution, but, unfortunately, one of them blew up on the water. The sailors also informed us, that the enemy wanted to fly from us, but that our fleet had got them into a bay which they could not escape from, without fighting, and that our Floating battery  was moored at the entrance of the bay, and three 24 pounders ready to open on them by daylight. From these accounts, it was imagined that in all probability, a few hours would determine who should be masters of the Lake-- though we made but little doubt of our being victorious; and all that day, waited with the greatest impatience-- watching earnestly with our glasses for the appearance of a boat."-- Lt. William Digby
¨

A furious "running battle" ensues as the British catch up with the American ships. In the vicinity of Split Rock other vessels strike their colors, unable to endure punishing broadsides from the huge British ships. Arnold makes the fateful decision to run part of his fleet aground in a tiny bay on the eastern shore. It is known as Ferris' Bay.

"Laying platforms in my Redoubt, the Small Schooner came from the fleet for provision & Saild down again, we heard Cannon we were allaramed by the firing of many Cannon." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
October
13

"this morning a Messinger came from the fleet about ten o'clock with a letter from Genl. Arnold informing that he had with his fleet been ingaged with the Enemies fleet 2 Day that we had lost a large Schooner run aground & burnt by the enemy a Gundalow Stript & Sunk by our men in the Bay of Bellcour our other Shiping much damaged & that we had about 60 men killed & wounded, but that we had got the better of the Enemy, but our fleet were determind to retreat to Crown point, we had this Day frequent information that our fleet was in a Shatterd Condition. About 3 o'clock our Schooner came in Sight, Soon after a Sloop & then a nother Schooner, & then the Row Galley & after a gundalow, & they were followed by the Inhabitants from Crown point & from Panton, they were followed by Col. Hartlys Regt., part by warter & part by land, bringing all the Horses, Cattle & So forth. at Sunset the Enemys fleet, 13 Sail anchord off about four miles from Crown point & made Signal for landing. all the boats came up in order to take the men in to the boats, when the last accounts left Crown point. all the buildings at & about Crown point were burnt by our people. Some of the Inhabitants ran Some 5, Some 7 or 8 Miles in the woods with women & Children in the greatest distress, leaving all there Houselstough, Cloathing &c to the enemy, or to the flames. a Mellancholly Sight that was Seen at Ticonderoga, but we may Expect a more Mallancholly Seen to morrow or Soon. God prepair us for it & grant us a Compleat Victory over our Enemy" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

"Octobr ye 12 & 13 our fleet Destroyed, only 5 out of 16. Returnd." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
October
14
"... about 3 o'clock a cannoe  was perceived a great distance makeing  all the way possible for our camp. On her nearer approach we perceived it was Sir Francis Clark [Sir Francis Carr Clerke], the general's aid-de-camp, who waving the enemies colors, thirteen stripes, declared the day was all our own. This happy intelligence was answered by the troops in three huzzas, and the joy expressed by the whole, gave evident signs of their satisfaction on so important a victory. He informed General Frazier that the enemies fleet had by some means escaped ours on the night of the 12th ; but the following day ours came up, and after a smart action, burnt, took or destroyed all their vessels on the lake. That a general Waterbury [General David Waterbury Jr.] and a great many were made prisoners; and that it was general Carlton's orders we immediately strike our camp, embark in our boats without loss of time, and make the best of our way to Crown Point, where we should receive further orders... Sir Francis also informed that general Arnold [General Benedict Arnold] who acted as commodore, after finding all was lost some how escaped on shore, after behaving with remarkable coolness and bravery during the engagement...we embarked about 4 o'clock in the evening..."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"At four o'clock in the morning Arnold and his men reached Crown Point in safety, having halted and been refreshed at the hospitable home of Zadock  Everest in Addison, about four miles from the scene of action. Later in the day, on the approach of the enemy, the small force at Crown Point withdrew and Gen. Carleton took possession without opposition."**

"mounting all the Cannon we had Carriages for & all the Carpenters & Smiths making New ones, our men repairing the works & making preparation to receive the Enemy. at Evning a Flag Came from Crown point with Genl. Waterbury & 106 prison, they are on there paroll not to take up arms in the presant dispute, & to return when Calld. for. the Enemy had not landed when Genl. Waterbury came away at 10 o'clock. Mrs. Hay went for Albany with ye Baggage." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

Hearing of the defeat at Valcour and the almost total destruction of the navy, the advance post at Crown Point is abandoned. What troops and stores remained at Crown Point are rushed south to Ticonderoga-Mt. Independence. Carleton lands troops and occupies the fort. He tries to advance south to the rebel works, but adverse winds prevent the advance for some 8 days. The Americans use this delay to significant advantage, as thousands of colonial militia pour into the works. The fortress is strengthened, especially Mt. Independence, and soon a mighty army of 12,000 strong await the invaders.

October 15
"this Day we heard nothing from the Enemy. Capt. Rew came in through the woods with 16 men, they left Genl. Waterbury Just before he Struck.went into a battoe & went on Shore." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
16

"I Breakfasted with Genl. Bricket. one of our Spies came in from Crown point & Says that the Enemy were incampt. in Col. Hartleys fort [Crown Point] & on Chimney point, about 100 tents in all & at Sunset the Enemy were landing & pitching there tents & yt he Saw a large party go out on the East Side of the Lake. he was informed that they were going up Otter Creek & to Skeensborough & Carlton said he would be in possession of Ticonderoga before Sunday & on his way to Albany where he was to have his Winter Quarters. Our Men work with life & Spirits this Day which shows a determined resolution to defend the place to the Last Extr. the habitants of the lake went of to Skeensboro 97 in No. we had 15 Tons of powder came into camp this Day & a Quantity of Lead." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
17

"Mounting Cannon, Making Carriages &c. Begun to make a log across the Lake or Chain to prevent the Shiping coming past the Jarsey Redoubt. it raind. Commissioner cam to this place from Congress." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
18

"a Very Rainey uncomfortable wet Day, I visited all the works & Redoubts & cut down part of the great bridge." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 19
"went to mount Hope & to the Mills. Dind with Genl. Gates &c afternoon went to Independant point, we cleard all our Guns Small arms & Cannon, Just at Sunset. 20 took the distance acrosst the Lake from the Jersey Battery & at ye point. Dind with Genl. Bricket & Mr. E Hitchcock, was out at ye Several works. Supt. with Genl. Gates, proposed making a bridge a cross to Independent Point it was aprovd. of by the Genl."  -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
20
[At Crown Point] "... we had good sport in shooting pidgeons, flocks of which flew over us thick enough to darken the air, also large eagles. There were herds of deer all along the shore side, which were seldom disturbed, the country being but little altered since its first state of nature, except now and then a wandering party of savages comeing  there to hunt for their subsistence. At night we landed and lay warm enough in the woods, makeing  large fires. When it rained, it was not so pleasant, but use reconciled all that soon to us, after being so long buried in such boundless woods, where our camp formed a grand appearance. Some few families who had not joined the enemy lived there; but had suffered much, as their cattle were mostly drove away for their loyalty. They had a force at Crown Point under the command of a Major Heartly, [Thomas Hartley] who thought proper to retire to Ticonderoga on our fleet comeing  so near his works, where they were thunder struck at hearing of the defeat of theirs, thinking it scarce possible. Our loss on the lake was about 60 men killed and wounded. Their general Waterbury, & the rest of the prisoners were sent back to them by general Carlton to Ticonderoga on their parole, and Capt Craig [James H. Craig] 47th light Infantry, went as a flag of truce with them..."--Lt. William Digby
¨
October
21

"I visited all the Several works on this Side both in the forenoon & afternoon. in the forenoon 3 Indians that was taken with Genl. Waterbury came in, they say that 5 tribes of Indians are with the Canadian army & are many. the 3 Stockbridge Indians left the others at Putnams Creek Last night. this evning, sone an hour high, 14 of the Enemies burch canoes came in Sight of 3 Mile point, that allarremed the army on this side. the Commissioners Set out for home. I sent 300 Dollars by Mr. John Taylor, D. Commissary, to Elisha Avery Esqr. Commissary Genl. for to be Sent to Mrs. Lucy Baldwin at Brookfield." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
22

"Dind. with Genl. Gates, one Man killd. & 2 taken by the Indians between the Mills & the landing. began to put ye Boom togeather." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 23
"it is remarkable the wind has been in the South, so that the Enemy could not come with there Vessels from Crown Point Since they came there to fight us at this place. " -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October
25
" Our Indians, who with Captn Frazier were advanced nearer their lines, took a prisoner and before they brought him to us painted the poor devil in a most curious manner, which almost frighted  him out of his wits. It often surprised us their not attacking us at Crown Point, their numbers being so greatly superior to ours."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"finish the boom acrosst & building a Bridge. -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 26
"the 2 prisoners taken ye 22 came in from Genl. Carlton. Capt. Ayres came in with 70 Malitia" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 27-28 
"Monday morning the British fleet approached Ticonderoga and landed from five large transports a detachment at Three Mile Point and another party was sent into a bay four miles below the works. Gen. Gates ordered the main garrison to be strengthened with the three regiments from Mount Independence and the defences manned. After two armed boats of the enemy had been fired upon by a row galley, Carleton, evidently deciding the post capable of defence, about four o'clock in the afternoon, withdrew to Crown Point, where he prepared to retire to Canada for the winter."**

The British fleet finally reach the American positions. A number of troops are landed, and others are sent out to reconnoiter the fortress complex. Gates and St. Clair make an impressive show of force- troops are paraded in full view of the fleet, guns bristle from the eastern and western shores of the peninsulas on the lake. It is decision time. It is also late in the season- winter approaches. The mighty display has its intended effect. Carleton is convinced this is not the time to mount a major offensive against the rebel works. By late afternoon, longboats return red-coated soldiers to the ships- Carleton turns his fleet around and sails back to Canada for winter quarters.  Precious time is gained for the rebel cause, the British would have to return another day.

"This morning I visited the workmen as Usual and came in to breakfast about 8, while I was at breakfast the alaram Guns was fired, about 9 o'clock 4 boats hove in sight at 3 mile point, one of the boats of the enemy Sounded the Channel within a Mile of our Battery. at 11 o'c. we gave them a flew Shot made them Hall of again, about 17 boats Rowd. about in sight till Sun an hour high & then they all went of. 3 Regts came over from Independant point, the 2 Regts at the Mills & at the landing was orderd. in, but soon after were Counter orderd." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
October
29
"Gen Carlton and General Phillips [Gen. William Phillips], who command the Artillery, went up towards their lines to reconnoitre  their strength, situation &c,. and which by them were thought of great extent & force. By deserters we heard they were then receiving fresh supplies of cannon and other stores. During the months of October and November, there are frequent squalls of wind on the Lake, which come momentary off the land and do great damage particularly to small craft. A few days before, the Carlton being under way and cruising on the Lake, one of these sudden squalls was very near laying her on her beam ends."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"all was clear no appearance of the Enemy, finished the bridge across the Lake to Independant point so that men could pass." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

October 30
"Our floating battery sailed for St Johns with stores &c... the country from Ticonderoga was in possession of the enemy."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"all was in peace, Capt. Dow & Mr. Adams dind. with me. Visited my workmen as Usual." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 1, 1776
"Col. Daton came in with his Regt. & a Deserter from Crown Point, & says that Carltons Army consisted of 10,000 besides 800 Canadians & Indians & that they were determind to drive us from Ticonderoga & that we might expet them to make a Vegerous push Very soon; our men were orderd to have 3 Days provision ready Cooked and to ly on there arms ready. The Comtt from Congress came in. The Comtt from Mass States came in. I went round all the works with the Comtts & Genl. Officers this Day." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 2
"We embarked in our battoes  and long boats for Canada, and proceeded about 17 miles, where our small fleet were obliged to put into a creek, the wind blowing very fresh, though fair to us, but causing a deep swell which was not so safe for the battoes; as to the long boats there was but little danger. Our soldiers called this place Destruction Bay [probably Ferris' (Arnold's) Bay], and not unaptly, as there we saw the great execution the enemy suffered on the 11th and 13th October. Some of their dead were then floating on the brink of the water, just as the surf threw them; these were ordered to be directly buried. During the night it blew fresh and was attended with a fall of snow which was the first we had experienced. The weather being fair we got under way, and with both sails and oars got a good distance before night."--Lt. William Digby
¨

November 3
"The rear guard of the British army left Crown Point, and it was immediately occupied by the Americans."**

"Drawing plans for the Continental States to send by the Comtt. this Evning a Scout came in & Reported that the Army had left Crown point, they went on bord the fleet yesterday about 11 o'clock, one Ship & a flew others, boats, were in Sight." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 4
"this Day a Confirmation was brought in that the Enemy had left Crown Point." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 6
"After a variety of weather, we made Point-au-Faire [Point au Fer]. We had a strong gale of wind crossing over Cumberland Bay, where we could not keep the shore without going six times the distance at least, and this short cut, if I can call it so, was near endangering many of our battows. Near that, we saw the wreck of the Royal Savage, and had the rest of their fleet behaved as well as she did, we should not have been as easyly  masters of the Lake. We found one Artillery man of ours who fell the 13th; him we buried. At night we made large fires as before, and lay round them, keeping our feet always next the fire, as when they are warm the body is seldom cold."--Lt. William Digby
¨

November 7
"Raisd a Barrak on Independant Point. Lt. Evens went of to Canada with the flag commanded by Col. Wigelsworth."
 -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 8
"Sent for Hay to Crown point. fair weather."
 -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 9
"Embarked for St Johns after remaining at Point-au-Faire [Point au Fer] from the 6th, on account of the delay in getting over provisions ammunition &c, &c., all which were sent down to St Johns before our moveing  from that post. We also brought with us the families who resided before at Crown Point, as it would have been cruel to have left them to the mercy of the enemy, who no doubt would persecute them, for their attachment to us. We had scarce pushed off the shore, about break of day, when the greatest fog arose I ever beheld, and which prevented our seeing above 3 or 4 yards from our boat's bow, in consequence of which we separated, some steering one way and some the other. Brig Gen Frazier caused drums to beat in his boat, by which he collected many others, but in place of going to St Johns he went directly the opposite course back to the Isle of mott [Isle la Motte] where he thought proper to land and wait till next day which was clear. At night we had a hearty reception from our Regiment..."--Lt. William Digby
¨
November
10
"The remainder of our Corps came down, the day being clear. Our ships were all laid up at this place for the winter, masts and rigging taken from them, and the ice broke round every morning and evening to prevent their keels from suffering by the severe frosts then shortly expected."--Lt. William Digby

"Raisd 4 Barraks on Independant Point. Col. Whitcomb with the officers of his Regt. did me the Honour to request me to take the Command of that Regt. The Comtt. also gave me the offer of ye Regt. Esqr Hill Died." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
November
11

"Employed 2 Men to Cut flints geting tools for that purpose building Chimneys & Covering Barraks. Nails came in, 20 Casks." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November 12
"Our men complaind they could not work as they had no other kind of provision but beef, flower came in afternoon." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
13

"began to build me a House: fine Weather" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
14

"cold and Snow. raisd. Smiths Shops." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
15

"Col. dehaus marchd for Albany & Regt." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
16

"Genl. St Clair Marchchd with 5 Regts for Albana. Raisd. 2 barraks on Independant Point, some Ice on the Lake." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
17

"Col. Wigelsworth returnd from the Enemy at Belcove & reports that he was treated with contempt & Ill used by ye Officers." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
18

"Genls. Gates, Arnold & Bricket left Camp" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
November 19
"Col. Paterson, Wayne, Dr. Canady & several other officers Dind. with me. Col. Patrson Marchd off." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
20

"Col. Phineys Regt. Marchd. of to Albany. 200 Men geting pickets, Stoning my Seller &c. Setled with Mr. Yancy for ye Men, Raisd. my House at this place.

I Simon Evins Lieutnant on half pay in the Service of his britanick Majesty, having been captivated by the army of the united states of America in canada, an Inhabitant whereof I then was, & the Honourable the Congress of the Said States, having resolved that the inhabitants of Canada captivated by the united States & not taken in arms be released & Sent home (a few excepted) upon this condition yt they sign a parole that they will not take up arms against the united States nor give intelligence to the Enemies of Said States, I do hereby agree & promis on the Honour & faith of a Gentleman that I will faithfully comply with the condition in the resolve before mentioned, containd during the war between his Brittanick majesty & Said States or untill I am duly exchanged, or discharged, I being released from my captivity & having leave to return home to Canada. Witness my Hand this 12 Day of Octobr 1776
Simon Evins  Copy"

November 21
"Over at Independant Point. I dind. with Col. Wain & Col. Wood" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
22

"it raind in the morning. onloading brick that came from Crown Point." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


November 23

"went over to independant point." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
24

"Recd. 141.18/ Lawfull of Mr. Yancy for Sauce." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
25

"Recd. 147.9.8 New York Currency to pay the workmen with that are going home." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
26

"paying off the men. Capt. Romanes Came." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
27

"Drawing plans & Writing letters to inform what will be nessacery in my department next year for an army of a 10,000 Men." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
28

"Mrs Hay came up. Esqr. Gilliland went away." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
29

"went over to independant point" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

November
30

"Setled with Mr. Yancy. Making up abstract." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


December 1 1776

"Recd. pounds 850-12-8 New York Currency which I this Day paid away to ye Officers." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


December 2

"Wrote to Saml. Adams Esqr & made a Return of tools & other Nessacerys wanted. The Enemy came this afternoon to Crown Point, as Capt. Church Reports who Saw them." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

December 3
"in the fore part of this Day we were prepairing to receive the Enemy but at Evning the Ship came up to Ti and brought Pertatoes & Indian corn from Onion River to Sell, but it is only a Battoe with 8 blankets & a bedtick for Sail that Loomd up at a distance but it gave a great surprise to many." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

December 4
"Set out & went to Lake george landing." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


December 5

"Set out in ye Battoe at 6 o'clock, Called at the hunting ground by Sabbath point, breakfasted & bought 2 quarters of venison for 18/ had a Very cold Voige across the Lake, got into Fort George about x o'clock. Very Cold. Lodgd with Mr. Carns. the Company Majr. Stevens, Majr. Frazier,'" Dr. Canada, Capt Cristy, Capt Ayres, Mr Yancy" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

Sources/Notes:

** THREE CENTURIES IN THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY: A COLLECTION OF HISTORICAL FACTS AND INCIDENTS- TERCENTENARY EDITION. 1909: Compiled and Edited by Mrs. George Fuller Tuttle. Saranac Chapter, D.A.R. Plattsburgh, NY.

James Hadden. Hadden's Journal and Orderly Books: A Journal Kept in Canada and Upon Burgoyne's Campaign in 1776 and 1777, by Lieut. James M. Hadden, Roy. Art. Edited by Horatio Rogers. (Albany: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1884)

  Jeduthan Baldwin, "The Revolutionary Journal of Col. Jeduthan Baldwin 1775-1778" (Bangor, Maine: The DeBurians 1906)

¨  William Digby, James Phinney Baxter, "The British Invasion from the North. The Campaigns of Generals Carleton and Burgoyne, from Canada, 1776-1777, with the Journal of Lieut. William Digby, of the 53d, or Shropshire Regiment of Foot, Illustrated with Historical Notes, by James Phinney Baxter, A.M." (Albany, New York: Joel Munsell's Sons 1887)

Illustrations by Benson J. Lossing and Felix Darley: Benson J. Lossing. THE PICTORIAL FIELD-BOOK OF THE REVOLUTION. VOL. I. New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers. 1850. Courtesy of the Floyd Harwood Collection.

*The reader will note that Hadden made this error often, he is frequently confusing East and West, Up and Down, when referring to the locations on the lake.-jpm

   
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