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Lake Champlain, Lake George, and Richelieu River
HISTORY TIMELINE
By James P. Millard

Part IV: war  in  the northern department
Invasion from the north- Carleton's Campaign 
JULY 1776- september 1776 

Events at Ticonderoga and Mt. Independence
the journals of col. jeduthan baldwin, Lieut. James Hadden, and Lieut. William digby

Spelling and punctuation in quotes are as found in the original. Black text with underlines indicates a hyperlink.

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July 1, 1776
"part of the army came up the Lake." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†


July 2

"Genl. Sullivan Returnd to Crown point with the Army & Vessels.
 -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 3
"The troops which had marched to Point au Fer, now fortified by order of General Sullivan, arrived at Crown Point with the baggage from Isle aux Noix. Gen. Gates at once commanded the building of his fleet, while the settlers of Addison worked with zeal in getting out timber and other material."**


"proposed to Cover the army by Redoubts, one of which was begun, but the men chiefly imployed in securing Stores. -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

Major General Horatio Gates is appointed to command of Ticonderoga and Crown Point by the Continental Congress.

He finds these posts in horrifying condition. Troops suffering the ravages of Smallpox were defending frontier outposts with nary a cannon mounted. Immediately efforts are made to reinforce the ailing garrisons, restore the troops to health, and secure them with much needed clothing and other necessities. Crown Point, in a controversial move, is reduced to an advanced observation post, while every effort is made to strengthen the defenses at Ticonderoga.

Recognizing that the fort at Ticonderoga was designed primarily to defend against invasion from the south, the peninsula to the east known as Rattlesnake Hill [Mt. Defiance to the south was also referred to as "Rattlesnake Hill" at times] is cleared and fortified. To become known as Mt. Independence, several batteries, a large hospital, and a star-shaped fort are built here. Three brigades are transferred across the lake from Ticonderoga.  

Skenesborough becomes a center of activity as a large fleet is constructed there. Motivated by  Congress' generous authorization of 34 2/3 dollars per month, shipwrights from all of the northern colonies start to stream into the tiny village on Wood Creek. Accompanied by a host of other craftsmen, the new American Navy begins to take shape on the southernmost edge of Lake Champlain. In a dramatic and controversial move, Benedict Arnold assumes command of the naval forces from Jacobus Wynkoop.

July 4
A Declaration of Independence is signed at Philadelphia by 56 members of Congress.

"a Genl. Court Martial Set for the trial of a No. of Officers & Soldiers." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 5
"Laid out Som works on Chimny point, [opposite Crown Point, on what is now the Vermont side of Lake Champlain] Genl. Schuyler, Genl. Gates & Genl. Arnol came to this place in the evning. 200 Men went to Cumberland head."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

"We were joined by a nation of savages, many more were shortly expected at our camp, and I must say their appearance came fully up [to] or even surpassed the idea I had conceived of them. They were much encouraged by Gen Carlton, as useful to the army in many particulars, but their cruel and barbarous custom of scalping must be shocking to an European; though practised on our enemies. They walked freely thro. our camp and came into our tents without the least ceremony, wanting brandy or rum... Their manner of dancing the war dance is curious and shocking, being naked and painted in a most frightful manner."--Lt. William Digby ¨

July 7
"Recd. orders to go to Ticondaroga with Som Car­penters & to cary all my Baggage, I collected all the Intrenching tools togeather."
 -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

With these orders, Chief Engineer Jeduthan Baldwin, of Brookfield, Massachusetts, began his remarkable efforts at the Ticonderoga and Mt. Independence peninsulas. Fortunately for us today, he kept a detailed journal. His day by day account continues below.

Col. Jeduthan Baldwin begins construction of the works at Ticonderoga and Mt. Independence

July 8
"went to Ticonderoga, with Genl. Schuyler & Genl. Gates, Viewd the grounds on the East Side ye Lake [Mt. Independence] with Col. Trumball on one Hill, took 26 Carpenters with me to repair ye Vessels & the Saw mill at Skeensboro" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 9
"
Viewd the Grounds on the east with Genl. Schuyler & Genl. Gates, round the peninsula, found Water by diging on the top of the Hill. Genl. Sullivan came in here." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
10

"
Went over & Marked out a road from the North point to the top of the Hill with Col. Wain & Col. Trumball. Genl. Sullivan Reconoiterd the Hill with me. I went up East Creek to the Head about 6 miles, a muddy bottom." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
11

"
Went over to the point with 200 Men to Clear a road, Dig well, &c. it was a Very rainey Day. We returnd about 12 o'clock to camp, Very wet."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
12

"
at work on the East Side."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
13

"
at work on the East Side. Genl. Waterbury came in. I Supt. with the Genl. & other officers."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
14

"on the East point as Usual."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
15

"
on the East point begun a 3d Vesell"-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 16
"in the morning between day and sunrise I heard some persons say that how come that Chest open, another person answerd sombody has robd it they have pulld up the tent pins & taken the chest out, upon which I arose in my shirt & went out & found 2 friendly Officers lamenting my loss, I examind & found that I was robd of my Hatt, a Camblet Cloak a Surtoot, a blieu Coat & Jacoat full trimd with a narrow Gold lace, a pair of Silk breeches, a Snuff colourd Coat turnd up with white, a Velvet Jacoat, 3 Cotton & 3 Wollon Shirts, 3 Stocks, 2 linen Handkfs, 2 pair of linen & 2 pair of woolen Stockings, a pair of Silver Shoe & knee buckels, a Surveyors Compass or theodiler, & between 35 & 40 Dollars in paper money, an ink pot, a knife, key & a Number of papers, & other articles. I immediately sent to all the Commanding officers present, & at the landing, acquainting them with my loss, the Army was all turnd out & a genl. Sirch made but none of my things found. I borrowed of a friend, a Coat & Jacoat & hatt, for I had none lift, I was Stript to my Shirt, my breeches & watch that lay under my head were saved only. Just at evning I heard that my coat turnd up with white & Velvet Jacoat was found with the buckles &c. in the pockets, hid in a blind place."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 17
"
in the Morning a part of my Compass was found broak to pieces & soon after the rest of it except the Needle. this Day I wrote to Genl. Sullivan to remind him of the request I had made of a discharge from the Army, desiring him to use his intrest in my behalf while at the Congress, as I am heartily tired of this Retreating, Raged Starved, lousey, thevish, Pockey Army in this unhealthy Country."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†
July
18
"Visited all my workmen as Usual but found many of them Sick & great complaints of the want of provision, yt they had only 12 ouz. of pork & 1 1/2 lb of Flower pr Day"-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

"This morning, just after the beating of the reveille, a courier reached the camp of the Americans who were posted on the hill, with a copy of the Declaration of Independence, which caused great enthusiasm in the camp. A feu-de-joie of thirteen guns, in honor of the thirteen Confederate States, was fired, and the hill named Mount Independence to commemorate the event."** [The courier arrived on July 18, it is likely that the 'Feu-de-joie' took place some days later, probably on July 28th.]

July 19
"a Very Heavey Rain last night & continewd the chief of the Day. 2 men of Col. De Haas Regt. were found in there tents drownded in warter, many others lay half coverd or Set up all night. such a heavey Rain is sildom known. this Day by Genl. Gates order I Recd 98 Dollars which will enable me to purchase Cloathing, if I can find them, but they are very scarce & deer."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
20

"over at the point. it raind."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
21

"over at the point. a very Showerry Day"-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
22

"I wrote to Congress."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
23
"... I arrived at Chamblee Fort, errected  at the lower part of the Rapids which break off the water communication to St. Johns, a distance of 15 miles. The Fort at Chamblee or rather the Shell of a large square House loop holed, is an ancient structure raised about 50 feet, totaly  of Masonry and intended as a defence against the sudden attack of the Savages..."--Lt. James Hadden ‡

"Laid out the park for the artillery on Rattlesnake Hill [Mt. Defiance], bought Carpenters tools of Six men & then discharged them."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 24
"Dind with Genl. Gates, & in the afternoon we went round the old French lines with Col. De Haws, which our people were at work Very fast."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July 25
"Genl. Gates & several other Officers went over to the point with me & highly approvd of the works that I had laid out there, & ordered that 220 men Should work daily at least & as many more as could be imployed & was in high good humor. Genl. Gates this Day treated me with high respect and inqured if I had sent the letter, (that I had shown him 3 Days before requesting a discharge from the Army or rather a resignation), and that I must not think of it, I told him that the Letter was not gone but that Col. Antill had got it, who was going to Philedelphia he said that he would write to the Congress to do somthing more for me & that I must not think of leaving the service, so that it is uncertain whether I see home so soon as I a few Days ago thought of."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
26

"Recd a letter from Col. Smith of New York. Recd a nother Letter from Capt. Hayes giving a perticular acount of the Publick affairs there, the Letter from Col. Smith is Very polite & complisant but a nother letter I recd this Day from my Lucy worth all that I have seen since I left New York, as it is the first that I have recd from her since I left Albany or even of having the pleasure of hearing from home. This Day there is a supply of fresh provision, & it is ordered that all the troops shall have 4 Days fresh & 8 Days Salt meat a week."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
27

"went over to the East point with Genl. Arnold & Col. Trumball. we orderd the encampment of the Briggade to be alterd. Recd. 200 Dollars to pay for Tools, by order of the Genl. Esqr Gillliand dind with me."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
28

"this morning I visited all the Artifficers before breakfast as Usual. I paid Esqr. Gilliland 212 Dollars for Carpenters tools as there is no Quartermaster Genl. at present with this army, I have that duty to do in part, & I have the intire direction of all the House & Ship Carpenters, the Smiths, Armourers, Roap makers, the Wheel & Carriage makers, Miners Turners, Coalyers, Sawyers & Shingle makers, which are all togeather 286, besides the direction of all the fateagueing parties, so that I have my hands & mind constantly employed night & Day except when I am a Sleep & then sometimes I dream."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
29

"went over to point Independancy [the east side of the lake, newly named Mt. Independence] with the working parties, this Day a French Malitia officer came into this place from St. Fransway in 20 Days, he informs that all the Indians Refuse to act against us. this Day I dind with Genl. Gates in Company with Genl. Arnold, Col. St. Clair, Col. Dehaws, Col. Wain, Col. Johnston Col. Antle, Col. Ogden & a No. of other Officers on fine Boild & Roast Beef &c."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
30

"at Ticonderoga & lodg in the Redoubt East of the Garrison in the point of Rocks, but as my business calls I am on Mount Independancy some Days 2 or 8 times in the Day as was the case this Day. Majr. Hay was Appointed D. Assistant Q. M. & began his service."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

July
31

"This Day I was over at point Independance and at the French lines, on the Heighths."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 1, 1776
"This Day All the Regts. turned out to work at the new battery which was Visited by the Genls. & a No. of Other Gentn, who all highly approved of the work. at Sunset one howet was fired on board a large Gundalow by way of experiment, the Shell brok in the air, one 13 inch Bomb was also thrown from the same Gundelow on bord of which were about 20 men, when the Bomb went of the Morter Split & the upper part went above 20 feet high in the Air over the mens heads into the water & hurt no man. the peice that blowd of weighd near a ton, I was nigh & saw the men fall when the morter burst, & it was a great wonder no man was kild."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
2

"this morning I went early to Independant Point where we Charged the other 13 inch morter, by way of tryal, when she was fired she burst Just in the same mannar (only this was on the land, & the other was upon the warter) that the other did near about the middle the whole length, so that we have no large Morter here now, these 2 morters were carried from this place to Cambridge & brought back & went Down to Canada & then back to this place, at an immence cost, altho they were worth nothing. Recd by Genl. Gates's Order 300 Dollars to pay for Tools, & other articles wanted in the army. in the afternoon I went round to see how the works were carried on at the french lines, found the works going on fast. laid out the ground for the Laboratory & Store near the park on Mount independance, drawing timber togeather for those buildings, wrote home by ye post."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†



August 4

"this Day 2 french Inhabitants came in from St. Johns, who inform that a french fleet had arived in Canad River, & that the Regulars were all but about 200 were gone from St. Johns & Chambolee to Quebeck with there artillery, but they know nothing of Capt. Biglow that went with the Flagg, or of Capt. Willson who are not returnd. 600 of the malitia arivd on the other side ye Lake, 2 miles from the Fort & several came in for provision &c."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 5
"in clearing the guns on bord of one of the gundelows one of the cannon went of as they were charging it & Killd the gunners mate he was blown into many peices & scatterd on the water. this afternoon I found in an old theifs pack, who was discharged & going home my Sartoot, silk breeches & 2 pair of Stockings, the thif is now confind in Irons in the dungeon."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 6
"this Day Lieut. Whitcomb returnd. from a Scout, has been near St. Johns, but brings no acct. of our Flag, or of Capt. Willsons party, & and that there is to appearance near 2000 Regulars at St. Johns. this morning I found my Hatt with a Serjant, in the afternoon a lad discoverd a pack in a Chimney which containd my Cloak, Laiced Coat & Jacoat, so that I have found my Cloathing, except my Shirts, 3 pair of Stockings & som Necks. the Needle to my Compass, & Cash I have not found."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 7
"this Day Majr. Stewart, Col. Courtlahd, Col. Hartly & Capt. Bush Breakfasted with me. Majr. Hay & Lady Came to Bord & Mess with me. this morning 2 of my shirts were found and some evidence apeard with the finding of the Hatt & shirts, against Serjant Majr. O'briant who desarted yesterday, & Genl. Gates this Day sent an officer down to fort Edward or albany to apprehend & bring back the desarter of whome I hope to get the money & all those Stolen goods I have lost. I let Lt. have 12 Dollars to bair his expense in his Journey after the thief."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 8
"2 of my Cotton Shirts were found & a fair prospect of finding the rest. I laid out a redoubt on the North end of the french lines by the lake. Breakfasted with Col. St. Clear, mad up a pay roll for the artifficers."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 9
"Dind with Col. D. Haws with large No. of Gentn. in the Brush Hall. in the afternoon I went over to the East point with Col. Hazen, Col. Antle, Col. Graton, Mr. Yancy & others. this Day we hear that a reinforcement was com to Genl. How at York, 4000 of them, Provincials troops coming in to Skeenboro & to this place.-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
10

"this Day the paymaster Genl. dind with me & the Commisery Genl. with several other Gent. Made up the pay roll for the artifficers of all Trades."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
11

"went over to Independant point with Genl. Gates & Arnold to view the works. they exprest entire satisfaction. in the afternoon I Recd. (by a warrant from the. genl.) 1262 Dollars to pay the artifficers under my care."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
12

"Last night about 12 o'clock Capt. Biglow returnd with the flag from the regulars after being detaind about a fortnight at the Oil Oix Noix [Isle aux Noix], where he was treated with coolness, & sivility by the Regulars. when he went to that place there was not more than 50 Regulars, the day after he arived there a reinforcement was Sent up from St. Johns. Capt. Stevens & his party about 85 men were all taken by about 80 cannadians & Regulars in burch Canoes Surrounded him & obliged him to surrender. Lt. Whitcom when he was on his scout between St. Johns & Chamblee discoverd an officer on horse back coming towards him. he secreted himself till the Officer came up & then he fired at & wounded him, but his horse carried him off. we hear by Majr. Biglow that the officer was Brigadear Genl. Gordon of the Regulars, who died of his wound the next Day. Majr. Biglow carried small chests of clothing for 2 of our officers who were prisoners with the Regulars in Canada, but they would not receive them. they are brot back. Just as Majr. Biglow was coming of an officer deliverd him a letter to George Washing Esqr. which he very cooly recd. with Genl. Carltons Orders which are very Insolent as followeth, viz.

      Chamblee, August 7th. 1776.

Parole St. Jerome Counter S. Paris Genl. Orders His Exelency Genl. Carlton Orders the commanding Officers of corps will take spetial care every one under their Command be informd yt messages or letters from Rebels or trators in arms against their King, Rioters, disturbers of the publick peace, plunderers, Robbers, assassines, or Murderers, are on no account to be admitted; that should Emisaries from such lawless Men again presume to approach, whether under the name of Flag of truce men or ambassadors, (except when they come to implore the Kings mercy) their Persons Shall be immediately seeised and committed to a place of confinment in order to be proceeded against as the law directs. there papers & letters for whomsoever, even for the Commander in Chief, are to be delivered to the Provost Martial, that unopened & unread they may be burnt by the hands of the common Hangman, at the same time the commander in chief supposes that neither the assassination of Brigadear Genl. Gordon nor the late notorious streach of faith resolving not to return the troops and Canadian taken at St. Johns in exchange for those rebels who fell into the hands of the Savages at the Seeders & Quenchen purchased from them at a great price, and restored to there Country on those express conditions, be not imputed to the provinces at large, but to a flew wicked & designing Men who first deceivd themselves, by these misled, the credulous multitude, to the brink of Ruin. afterwards usurped authority over them established a dispotick Tyrony not to be born, & wantonly & foolishly endeavor to provoke the spilling the Blood of our unhapy Countrymen of this Continent in hopes of covering over there own guilt or confirming there Tyrany by the general disturbance of there Country. let there crimes pursue those faithless bloody minded Men who assart that Black is White, & White is Black. it belongs to Brittons to distinguish themselves not less by their humanity than by there Valyor, it belongs to the Kings Troops to leave the blood of his deluded subjects whose greatest fault perhaps is having been deceived by such men to there own distruction, it belongs to the Crown, it is the duty of all faithful servants to restore from oppression and restore to liberty the once free and happy loyal people of this continent, all prisoners from the rebellious provinces who desire to return home, are to hold themselves in readiness to imbark at a Short notice, the Commisary Mr. Murry shall visit the Transports destind for them and see that wholsom provisions necessary cloathing with all possible conveniency for theire passage be prepaired for those unfortunate men. they are to look on there respective Provinces as there Prison & there remain till further enlarged or summoned to appear before the Commander in Chiefs of this province, or any other commander in Chief for his Majesty, for the Time being, which Summons they Shall Obey. Genl. How will regulate there place of Landing."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 13
"Genl. Bricket came in from No. 4 with others." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
14
"Our corps moved up to the Isle Aux Noix, in such battows  as were ready, by which the first brigade took up our ground at St John's, and was, of course, a general movement to the army. The island is about one mile long and half a one in breadth, mostly covered with wood, which in a short time we cleared for our camp, which was badly situated, being in a swamp, and much troubled with snakes &c... The main land was but a small distance from us, it scarce there deserves the name of a lake, it being not very broad, but the shore is such a swamp and so thick with wood, that you can scarce land, and those unbounded forests quite uninhabited, except by Indians and other savage beasts."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"laid out a redoubt on Independant Mount, which Genl. Gates & others aprovd. of. Dind with Col. D. Hart & Wain." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 15
"Raised the Labratory. Laid out & began Ridoubts on the North end of the old french lines in the afternoon." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
16

"laid out a Redoubt on the North side of the point with Col. St. Clear & Cap. Newland, went over to Independent Point Col. Hasel, Col. Antle, Col. St. Clear, Col. wain, Col. Maxwell, Col. Trumball, Majr. Stewart & others had a fine Dinner, they dind with Majr. Hay & myself." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
17

"Laid out a wharf at the South side of Independant point & orderd a large Stoer House to be built & also 2 guard housen & then I returnd with Col. Wain & Col. Trumball, went into the woods near the Saw mill by a Spring where we had a fine dinner, Venison roasted on Sticks Indian fashon, an Elegant Entertainment made by Col. D Haws, Col. St. Clear & Col. Wain at which the Genl. & about 15 other officers were present. a fine afternoon." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
18
"One sloop, three schooners, and five gunboats, carrying 55 guns, 70 swivels, with a complement of 395 men, were ready for the new fleet which was to meet the English on the lake. Arnold was chosen to take command, much to the disappointment of Jacobus Wynkoop, a captain of the Continental army, who now refused to take orders from Arnold and, in consequence, was ordered arrested by Gen. Gates and was taken, a prisoner, to headquarters at Ticonderoga, whence he was sent to Albany."**

"I went to Independant point, I returnd with an invitation & dind with the Genl. in Compy with about 20 other officers. Comadore Winecoop confind by Genl. Arnold."-- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 20
"went with Genl. Bricket to the Redoubts laid out a 1/2 Sircler one" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
22

"Dind with Capt. Ayres. went over to Mackintoshes, ordered the Setting of the Great Store house & Supt. with mrs Hay, Mr. Raiment went away." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
23

"Dind & Supt with Genl. Gates & Recd a letter from Esqr. Gilliland." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 24
"laid out a Redoubt on the N. W. side on the plain at the old French lines." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
25

"went out to the Sawmill to loo out a Suitable place for 2 Regts to incamp Genl. St. Clair, Col. Wain, Col. Allen & Capt. Dow went with me, Genl. Gates, Genl. St. Clair, Col. D. Haws, Trumball, Lewis, Majr. Steward & Docter Cannada dind with me in the afternoon. Recd. a letter from Genl. Thomson informing that he was at Quebeck harbour, Ready to Sail the 5th of August with all the prisoners in Canada going to New York, this letter came by two prisoners who had liberty to return to there homes on the Lake by them we larn that the Regulars are in a readiness to pay us a Visit" -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
26

"a very Rainey Day I wrote & was paying of my workmen all Day." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
28

"it raind hard & was dirty weather. Dind with Genl. Gates & Supt." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
29

"Genl. Bricket & Capt. Newland Dind with me. Concluded to build a Saw mill. began to hiew the Timber in the afternoon Mr. Lucas went of for Philedelphia we double mand our Smiths fires & workt in all the Shops both night & Day to get the Shiping riggd. & the artillery mounted. -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August
30
"For some days past we had the most severe and constant rain; it poured through all our tents and almost flooded the island [Isle Aux Noix]; yet the days were very hot with violent bursts of thunder; attended by frequent flashes of lightening. The idea of service to those who have not had an opportunity of seeing any; may induce them to believe the only hardship a soldier endures on a campaign is the danger attending an action, but there are many others, perhaps not  so dangerous, yet, in my opinion, very near as disagreeable,-- remaining out whole nights under rain and almost frozen with cold, with very little covering, perhaps without being able to light a fire; fearing the enemy's discovering the post, and not knowing the moment of an attack; but always in expectation of one... We had a guard about 4 miles above the island, on the main land, where there were great flocks of wolves. During the night we could hear them after a deer through the woods, and then cry something like a pack of hounds in full chase. They often came near our out centries,  but they being loaded, did not much mind them."--Lt. William Digby
¨

"Took Physic, was poorly, but went out a little upon business ordered 20 Men to assist the Carpenters geting timber to 1/ pr Day the time they are about the Saw Mill." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August 31
"the Lee Gundalo & Row Galley Saild from this Down the Lake Sent a party down the lake to bring up the Runing Geers of Mr. Raymonts Mill, Col. Brewers Regt. & Col. Phinneys Regt came in this Day. yesterday Departed this life my very good friend Coll. Bond & this D was buried under Arms after a suitable discourse, & Prayer. a discharge of Cannon at the Fort much lamented by his brother officers. he lay Sick about a Week & died with the yallow feaver." -- Col. Jeduthan Baldwin†

August-September

The American navy sails forth from Skenesborough.  The schooners Royal Savage, Revenge, and Liberty together with 5 gondolas and the sloop Enterprise, travel down the lake as far as Windmill Point. They are dismayed to find the British have forces as far south as the Île aux Tętes. After a skirmish with Indians allied with the British at Windmill Point, they retire to Bay St. Amand, just north of Cumberland Head. While anchored here, Arnold sends vessels south to sound the narrow channel between the Island of Valcour and the mainland. Finding a fine anchorage at this location, the fleet moves to Valcour Bay on the 23rd of September. They are joined by other vessels from Skenesborough.

Sources/Notes:

** THREE CENTURIES IN THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY: A COLLECTION OF HISTORICAL FACTS AND INCIDENTS- TERCENTENARY EDITION. 1909: Compiled and Edited by Mrs. George Fuller Tuttle. Saranac Chapter, D.A.R. Plattsburgh, NY.
James Hadden. Hadden's Journal and Orderly Books: A Journal Kept in Canada and Upon Burgoyne's Campaign in 1776 and 1777, by Lieut. James M. Hadden, Roy. Art. Edited by Horatio Rogers. (Albany: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1884)
  Jeduthan Baldwin, "The Revolutionary Journal of Col. Jeduthan Baldwin 1775-1778" (Bangor, Maine: The DeBurians 1906)
¨
 
William Digby, James Phinney Baxter, "The British Invasion from the North. The Campaigns of Generals Carleton and Burgoyne, from Canada, 1776-1777, with the Journal of Lieut. William Digby, of the 53d, or Shropshire Regiment of Foot, Illustrated with Historical Notes, by James Phinney Baxter, A.M." (Albany, New York: Joel Munsell's Sons 1887)
Illustrations by Benson J. Lossing and Felix Darley: Benson J. Lossing. THE PICTORIAL FIELD-BOOK OF THE REVOLUTION. VOL. I. New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers. 1850. Courtesy of the Floyd Harwood Collection.
*The reader will note that Hadden made this error often, he is frequently confusing East and West, Up and Down, when referring to the locations on the lake.-jpm

   
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